Sauda Abdul-Mumin

Sauda Abdul-Mumin

Pronouns: She / Her

Chanel Cole, Board Treasurer

Pronouns: She / Her

introduction coming soon

Karen Chung

Karen Chung

Pronouns: She / Her

Karen developed a passion for prison abolition and advocacy for justice-impacted people after facing a conviction and serving time in Minnesota. Karen has a background as a mental health therapist and is currently a doctoral candidate, completing her dissertation on how peer mentorship aids in re-entry for justice-impacted women. Karen is the contracts manager with Community Passageways, an organization focused on creating alternatives to incarceration for youth and young adults. Additionally, Karen works to support equitable employment for impacted people with Weld, as well as working with Washington Voices to support the humanity of those facing sex offense convictions.

Gerald Labensky

Gerald Labensky

Pronouns: He / Him

Gerald is a Field Leader of Chipotle Mexican Grill overseeing the Pacific Northwest market. He is passionate about breaking employment barriers and supporting People of Color transitioning from incarceration to society. Gerald served 17 years of a 40-year sentence in the Washington State system from 1996 to 2013. Gerald joined the Freedom Project board in 2018.

Pam Orbach

Pam Orbach

Pronouns: She / Her

Pam is a Restorative Justice practitioner, mediator, circle keeper, Nonviolent Communication (NVC) consultant and trainer. In addition, she also is an executive empathic self-leadership coach. Pam’s practice is grounded in Marshall Rosenberg’s Nonviolent Communication and Dominic Barter’s model of Restorative Circles. Her work is informed by her previous experience teaching both middle and high school, and her years supporting conflict between parents and teens/youth for the City of Bellevue, where she supervised a parent-teen mediation program.

Vidal Vincent

Pronouns: He / Him

Vidal “Blaze” Vincent was tried as an adult and convicted of Attempted Murder and Assault at the age of 17. He was sentenced to 30 years and six months. He would have received no more than 4 years had he been tried as a juvenile. In light of the Washington state supreme court’s decision in State v. Blake, Blaze was resentenced and immediately released from incarceration after serving 18 years in 2022. The sentencing judge held that Blaze was more valuable to society outside of prison than inside because of his rehabilitation and commitment to service. 

Despite prison conditions that were unsuitable for youth, Blaze grew to become a peer mentor and community advocate. While incarcerated, he earned an Associate of Applied Science Degree in Business Management from Grays Harbor College with a 3.8, a paralegal diploma from Blackstone Career Institute, and Competent Communication and Competent Leadership Awards from Toastmasters International; as well as a myriad of other certificates for completing positive programs. Also while incarcerated, Blaze co-created a successful behavioral health program called the Redemption Project alongside Anthony Powers and Karlton Daniel. Before his release, he was serving as Vice President of the Harbor Lights Toastmasters club and facilitator of the Black Prisoners Caucus legislative committee at Stafford Creek Corrections Center. He also continues to serve as a contributor to Kids are Kids, a grassroots community-based organization that seeks to abolish laws that cause juveniles to be tried as adults in Washington state.

Blaze continues his lifelong commitment to service alongside his fiance, Dyneeca, with massive support from family, friends, and his community. 

Emily Westlake, Board Secretary

Emily Westlake, Board Secretary

Pronouns: She / Her

Emily has been working in prison reform since moving to Seattle in 2013, first volunteering with the If Project and Freedom Education Project Puget Sound and later joining the staff of Yoga Behind Bars as Administrative Manager. She is a graduate of Seattle University’s Masters of Nonprofit Leadership program and is now the Development and Community Partnership Manager at CHOOSE 180, an organization that collaborates with systems to transform the way in which young people are criminalized and help them achieve their goals. Emily’s family was deeply impacted by the criminal legal system with the incarceration of her father, and she has been committed to transforming the justice system ever since. She is from New York and in her free time enjoys swimming, music, and art. Emily is inspired by the work that Freedom Project does, and specifically their commitment to racial equity and healing. She is thrilled to join the Freedom Project team.